Colombia

Colombia’s countercurrent:
Historical paradoxes of a democracy in crisis

“From the alphabet soup that makes up the trade union movement to the disciplined militancy of peasant farmer associations, from the grassroots organizing of community mothers to consciousness-building campaigns of public university students, from the Afro-Colombian leaders fighting against state-sponsored racism and economic injustice to the many local, regional, and national organizations representing the country’s over ninety officially recognized indigenous groups, Colombian civil society continues to challenge the profoundly undemocratic nature of the state, and its powerful benefactors who control the levers of both national and transnational private capital.”
— Mario A. Murillo, from his introduction to the Colombia chapter of Until the Rulers Obey

Indigenous and Afro-Colombians gather to discuss water issues, in Silvia, Cauca, Colombia, 2008. Photo by Clifton Ross
Indigenous and Afro-Colombians gather to discuss water issues, in Silvia, Cauca, Colombia, 2008. Photo by Clifton Ross

Until the Rulers Obey includes four interviews from Colombia:

Manuela Ruiz/ecologist
Interview and translation by Clifton Ross, July 2008

Luis Yonda /Regional Indigenous Council of Cauca (CRIC), Popayán, Colombia
‘Through everything we’ve been murdered and suffered abuse,
but the indigenous people have been persistent’
Interview and translation by Clifton Ross, July 2008

Antonio Navarro Wolff/Governor of Nariño state, former M-19 Guerrilla
‘I like starting from the concept of democracy:
economic democracy, political democracy, social democracy’
Interview and translation by Clifton Ross, July 2008

Jesus Tuberquia/ San Jose de Apartadó Peace Community
‘We believe in the dignity of human life against a worldwide system of death.’
Interview by Clifton Ross, March 2011, Translation by Christy Rodgers

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